Outreach

Church of the Redeemer in Kenmore, Washington, supports community and international outreach. We welcome you to help us reach out to others with your participation of time, skills, and money.

One regular outreach activity is very personal. People from Church of the Redeemer arrange to wash and care for the feet of those experiencing homelessness.

There are times people from Redeemer for a day to prepare lunch as part of a regular program. We would like to be able to establish such a program in our local area.

Sometimes we help to start programs, but step back later as others step up to maintain the program. These programs always remain in our hearts.

There are several regular activities to provide something special to people being served by Hopelink.

We are always interested in new activities with new people. How would you like to serve God in serving others?

The Earley Outreach Fund

Since 2009, a wide variety of outreach projects have been supported by the Earley Outreach Fund. These outreach efforts at Redeemer embody our shared values as a parish, with the acronym “LAMBS”:

  • Live out our baptismal covenant
  • Actively engage the time and talents of Redeemer members, and inspire others
  • Meet the needs of our local community, while remaining open to global needs
  • Bold gifts freely given and wisely used
  • Strive to replenish the Outreach Fund over time

Supported programs

These are some of the programs supported by the Earley Outreach Fund in the past and currently:

We invite you to support the projects funded through the Earley Outreach Fund. Make a donation through the PayPal link on any page on the Church of the Redeemer website. You don’t need a PayPal account of your own.

History

Butterfly Shop closing appreciation from September 2007

Butterfly Shop closing appreciation from September 2007

The Earley Outreach Fund started in the former Butterfly Thrift Store. This was a crowded-but-tidy shop that sold used and consigned household goods and clothing in downtown Bothell, Washington. The shop was staffed by volunteers from and operated by Church of the Redeemer.

During more than two decades of operation, the Butterfly distributed over $275,000 in small grants to local people with urgent needs. These grants were for things like the following:

  • Paying the utility bill for families in danger of losing power
  • Getting the last few dollars of someone’s rent together
  • Paying for medical bills, gas, or bus vouchers.

Over 2,500 people were helped over rough spots by the “Butterfly Ladies.”

An aging volunteer staff and an unsolicited offer to purchase the property in late 2007 led to the decision to close the Butterfly and sell the property. The $300,000 purchase price was not treated as a windfall for the church. Instead, Redeemer’s parishioners placed the entire sum into an outreach fund to continue to serve those in need. While efforts would be made to replenish the fund, the parish would not hold back granting the money.

This fund became the the Earley Outreach Fund. The name recognizes Gretchen and John Earley, leading lights of the Butterfly for its entire existence.

During the first year, Redeemer’s parishioners developed a process for grant application and funding that embodied our Christian values. It is a process that is short on forms and bureaucracy. Instead, the process is long on human interaction.

Parish members, chosen at random, meet with a prospective applicant. They help to develop the proposal and assess ways in which Church of the Redeemer can help through money grants and volunteer efforts. When fully formed, the proposal is presented to the whole Church. Ultimately, the Vestry (the financial governing body in an Episcopal parish) decides on the proposal.

How it Works

Anyone can propose an outreach project for the church. It is a community-focused process that culminates with the project being offered to God prayerfully in the Eucharist.

Even if you don’t attend Redeemer, we welcome you to come with your idea on how to help others who are in need. Everyone goes through the same process. You work with members of the Redeemer to make your idea a reality.

  • Contact the parish office to make a proposal at office@redeemer-kenmore.org or (425) 486-3777.
  • If a proposal meets guidelines developed by the parish, a Vestry liaison and a discernment group is appointed to meet with you, probably several times.
  • The completed proposal is presented to the parish for prayerful consideration.

The Outreach Proposal Toolkit guides the development of the proposal. Download an electronic copy of the Outreach Proposal Toolkit. The toolkit is in Google Docs format.

A short video has been produced called “How to Access Outreach Funds.”

Things supported by people from Church of the Redeemer

People from Church of the Redeemer has supported the following, either through the Earley Outreach Fund and with volunteers.

Capitol Hill Community Lunch

Church of the Redeemer volunteers at Community Lunch in 2012

Redeemer is one of many community groups that volunteer at Community Lunch on Capitol Hill in Seattle. The program receives an Earley Outreach Fund grant to pay for a social worker to be on site.

Community Lunch provides full hot meals and other critical services to homeless and hungry people in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. Volunteers are always welcome.

Funding an intern in Bolivia

Breanne with Swimmers

In September 2012, the Earley Outreach Fund provided major funding for Breanne Overton to be a volunteer intern at Mosoj Yan in Bolivia. She worked with homeless and abused girls and adolescents. She kept a blog, BreInBolivia, about her experiences there.

Her stay was extended after starting a unique empowerment activity, teaching the young women at Mosoj Yan to swim. Bre raised enough money from friends and family for this activity. The Vestry at Church of the Redeemer voted to increase her stipend so she could stay longer in Bolivia to start the activity.

On Pentecost, May 20, 2013, Breanne gave a talk on her experiences in Bolivia following the worship service. Read some comments from Breanne and watch a video of her talk.

Camp with la Iglesia Episcopal de la Resurreccíon, Mt. Vernon

2012 Outreach Resurrección-Redeemer-Day-CampIn August 2012, members of Church of the Redeemer traveled  to Mt. Vernon, Washington, to co-host a day camp for children of farm worker families with la Iglesia Episcopal de la Resurrección. This camp allowed the older siblings to attend tutoring programs to help keep them from falling behind in school. Otherwise, the older siblings would have to care for the younger children in the busy summer farming season,

This effort was repeated in July-August 2013 with a four week camp, and again in 2014. Read about the 2014 camp.

Market Bucks: Friends of Third Place Commons

Market Bucks are food coupons redeemable at the Lake Forest Park Commons Farmers Market. Various Northshore and Shoreline social service agencies distribute Market Bucks. In 2011, 2012, and 2013, Redeemer gave a total of $18,500 to Market Bucks, providing the backbone of the program. Support has continued through 2015.

The Lake Forest Park Farmers Market is a project of the nonprofit Friends of Third Place Commons in Lake Forest Park, Washington.

Read Market Bucks Program at the LFP Farmers Market Serves Those in Need.

Homeless Footwashing Project: United Way Community Resource Exchange

Debi Laughlin washing a foot.Redeemer participates in the Homeless Footwashing Project at the United Way Community Resource Exchange. A podiatrist volunteers time and talents to care for nails and calluses. Everyone is treated to clean feet, powder, and fresh socks.

Read about these occasions for washing feet:

Church of the Redeemer

Community life at Redeemer centers on worship in the Episcopal traditionArt and music vitally deepen this worship. Our faith expresses itself with service to people, locally to internationally.

Church of the Redeemer is at 6211 182nd Street in Kenmore, Washington. The campus is a short distance north of Bothell Way, near the Burke-Gilman Trail. Turn at the Episcopal Church shield sign, and go down the hill. The entrance looks like a gravel driveway. The campus is larger on the inside than it is on the outside.

The Episcopal Church welcomes you.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmailby feather